Wednesday, December 7, 2016

CFP: Charles F. Fraker Conference: "The Image Reframed: Visions of Instability"

Deadline for abstracts: December 10th

2017 Charles F. Fraker Conference
The Image Reframed: Visions of Instability
February 10​th​ and 11​th​, 2017
Ann Arbor, Michigan.

The 2017 Charles F. Fraker Conference at the University of Michigan will take as its point of departure the contested nature of the image, a point that is critical to the dialogue between our keynote speakers, Michael Taussig and W. J. T. Mitchell. Images can sear, blur, fade, or proliferate.Images can be captured, scanned, altered, or reproduced. The image is a subject and an object; there is a categorical instability to the image that belies the hard dimensions of the frame. We are interested in images, the way they inform us about the past and the present, and also the way they affect our notions of reality and personhood. With the significant development of image-making technology, is it still possible to accept the truth claims of any given image? How can we still approach their historical, socio-political indexicalities and authorial intentions without skepticism?

Where do we locate images in the narration of history? How do we interpret history through images? How do we look at images as manifestation of historical phenomena? What agency is allowed in the space between the author of an image and the reception of the image? Does the image itself have an agency? How does image production impact the agency of subjects that are represented? In what ways can we overcome the distancing effects that are generated by the cloning of images? When viewing an image, does the spectator put oneself in the same position as the image’s author? Does the reproduction of the image blur these positions, and what is at stake in this disruption?

Papers may explore, directly or obliquely, images that represent, challenge, or distort notions of:
  • literature framing objectification & subjectification
  • photography media & mediation authorship & spectatorship
  • still images production & consumption history & historicity
  • cinema visual culture memory
  • illustration looking & seeing politics
  • maps gaze nation state & empire
  • technology perception friendship, enemies & betrayal
  • reproducibility invisibility resistance
  • aura otherness the city
  • cloning object & subject (de)territorialization
  • archive analogy indexicality
  • ethics posthumanism obscenity
  • violence gender

The Charles F. Fraker Conference is hosted by the Department of Romance Languages and
Literatures at the University of Michigan. We welcome abstracts up to 250 words for papers in any Romance language or English engaging cross-disciplinary questions of the image. We encourage scholarly investigations in the form of academic papers, but also alternative forms of inquiry such as hybrid prose, poetry, performance, photography, or film. Works may deal with Romance literary or cultural studies as well as other disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Please include a brief bio with submissions.
Please send your abstract and brief bio to frakerconference@umich.edu by December 10th of 2016.

Job: Positions in the fields of Russian and comparative literature, and literary theory

Deadline: December 26, 2016

Department of Comparative Literature and Linguistics, HSE St. Petersburg, announced three vacancies (rank open) in the fields of Russian and comparative literature and literary theory, beginning in September 2017. We are seeking scholars interested in interdisciplinary approach to literature and cultural history. In paticular, the following fields of specialization are sought:

1. Anglo–American literature (taught in English)
2. Russian and European poetry of the neneteenth and twentieth century.
3. Literature, cultural history and theory of modern time (20th-21st century)

Applicants must have a PhD or have definitive plans for obtaining the doctoral degree by the end of the 2016-2017 academic year.

Applications should be addressed to Boris Gasparov, Dept. chair, at <philspbnabor2016@gmail.com>. An application should include:

1. CV (including list of publications and information about teaching experience)
2. A writing sample (recent publication or a work prepared for publishing)
3. Names of addresses of two references.
4. A syllabus of an undergraduate research seminar, including brief description, reading for 20 classes, and a list of suggested research topics.

The department will begin reviewing the applications after December 26.

Additional information about the HSE program is available at the website http://spb.hse.ru/ba/philology/.

For all questions about the vacancies please write to Prof. Gasparov <bg28@columbia.edu> or to Prof. Evgeny Kazartsev <kazar@list.ru>.

Funding: Title VIII Research and Summer Scholarships, Kennan Institute

Deadline: January and February 15, 2017

The Kennan Institute is again holding its annual Title VIII grants competition. The deadline for Research and Summer Scholarships is January 15, 2017, with the deadline for Short-term grants following on February 15, 2017. A description of the Research and Summer grants are listed below, and information about all grants can be found at: https://www.wilsoncenter.org/kennan-institute-fellowships-and-internships.

Kennan Institute Title VIII Research Scholarships (3-9 months duration)
Title VIII Research Scholarships lasting three to nine months are available to academic participants in the early stages of their career (before tenure) or scholars whose careers have been interrupted or delayed. For non-academics, an equivalent degree of professional achievement is expected. Eligibility is limited to the postdoctoral level for academic participants, although doctoral candidates in the process of completing a dissertation may apply (the dissertation must be successfully defended before taking residence at the Kennan Institute). Applicants must be U.S. citizens. Research proposals examining the countries of Eurasia are eligible. Policy-relevant research is preferred. Those proposals related to regional Russia, Ukraine, Central Asia, Belarus, the Caucasus, and contemporary issues are particularly welcome. The Title VIII Research Scholar grant offers a stipend of $3,500 per month, research facilities, computer support, and some research assistance. Grant recipients are required to be in residence at the Institute in Washington, D.C. for the duration of their fellowship.

One round of competitive Title VIII Research Scholar selection is held per year. The deadline for receipt of applications and supporting materials is January 15, 2017. Application materials may be submitted by email. Decisions on appointment will be made in early March; awardees are able to commence their appointments as early as July.

The application can be downloaded at: https://www.wilsoncenter.org/sites/default/files/title_viii_research_app_2016_fillable.pdf

Kennan Institute Title VIII Summer Research Fellowships (2 months)

Scholars who conduct research in the social sciences or humanities focusing on Russia and the other countries of Eurasia, and who demonstrate a particular need to utilize the library, archival, and other specialized resources of the Washington, D.C. area should consider applying for the summer research fellowship. Policy-relevant research is preferred. The summer research fellowship must be used for two consecutive months between May-September 2017, and applicants are required to hold an MA degree or higher. The Summer Research Scholarships will provide a stipend of $7,000 for two months, research facilities, computer support, and some research assistance. Travel and accommodation expenses are not directly covered by this fellowship.

Applicants are required to submit a concise description (700-800 words) of his or her research project, curriculum vitae, a statement on preferred dates of residence in Washington, D.C., and two letters of recommendation specifically in support of the research to be conducted at the Institute. All of these materials may be submitted via email to kennan@wilsoncenter.org. (Letters of recommendation may also be sent by email as scanned, signed letters.) Applicants must be U.S. Citizens. Closing date is January 15, 2017.

Questions can be sent to kennan@wilsoncenter.org.

CFP: Comparative Approaches to Illegal Housing across the Globe'

Deadline: 6 January 2017

Conference ‘Comparative Approaches to Illegal Housing across the Globe’
University College London, 22/23 June 2017
Deadline for submission: 6 January 2017

We are inviting researchers on illegal housing who are interested in challenging the limitations of 'their' region, who are open for confrontations with the ‘other’, and also open for discovering their own 'blind spot'. This Call for Papers appeals to academics from all over the globe who are content to let themselves in for comparisons. Although some of topics would clearly benefit from large sample analysis, we would like to begin with paired-comparisons. We consider comparisons of two, perhaps three regions a viable approach for the conference in planning. Ideally, the comparison should be accomplished by cooperation with someone else. Nevertheless, solitary projects are welcome, too.

We would like to encourage you to submit ideas for comparison of informal/illegal housing in different parts of the world.

Please include in your abstract (500 words maximum):
  • Areas/places you are comparing.
  • What aspect you place in the focus of your study.
  • Why do you think is that comparison meaningful and able to provide new insights?
If you don’t have carried out a comparative project yet but consider a comparison of your topic with studies in other regions a promising idea, you can also submit a brief description of your research, and we could try to form a comparative panel with someone else.

Please find below some suggestions for possible starting points for comparison but feel free to add your own idea:

1. Transfer of Concepts
It would be interesting to test existing attempts to systematize illegal housing (such as typologies) which work well in certain regions regarding their usefulness in different parts of the world.

2. Cross-fertilizing
Do squatters in different parts of the world learn from each other? To what extent is there a global transfer of experiences and practices?

3. Opportunity Structures
Why is illegal housing in some parts of the world more accepted than in others? Is this perhaps related to somewhat different concepts of property in different regions? How different is illegal housing in democracies and dictatorships? To what extent is the fact that some state institutions tolerate or ignore illegal housing related to a specific degree of social acceptance of squatting (and related practices)?

4. Slums
Can we study informal Roma housing in Europe as ‘Northern slums’ using comparisons with Latin American squatter settlements?

5. Illegal Housing Construction
What can we learn from comparisons of illegal housing construction at the outskirts of, say, Warsaw, Izmir and Buenos Aires?

6. Squatting as an Alternative Social Order
Which strategies are developed aiming at maintaining social order within illegally occupied houses/quarters/settlements? Can we understand squatting as a world of ‘indigenous cultural practices’ (Bjoerkman)?

7. Squatting – a devious route to Capitalism?
Isn’t squatting often just a hidden path to get on the housing ladder? Many Latin American squatter 'settlements, in spite of their illegality, foster private property' (van Gelder). To what extent is the goal of informal housing in Latin America to acquire property rights? Is the squatters’ attitude to property different in the South (and perhaps East) and in the North-West? Apart from that, it would be interesting to compare entrepreneurial squatting in different parts of the world and to ask for its potential to provide alternative models.

8. Squatting beyond Housing
Squatting as lifestyle, establishing social or cultural centres, conservational squatting or the intention to restore more authentic urban places - are these genuine Western ideas or are there equivalents in the global South as well?

9. Interaction of Political Activists and Squatters
To what extent are ‘ordinary squatters’ just people in need looking for a roof over their head who are keeping a low profile and are not very interested in joining a campaign or a movement? In recent time, there was a certain overlap of squatting and anti-globalisation campaigns in the Northern Hemisphere – are the two associated in the global South as well?

10. ‘Bad Squatters’
To what extent is crime, drugs, violence a real problem in squatter settlements? Do we create and cultivate a blind spot if we belittle it as an imagination of neoliberal politicians and the media? Shouldn't we better study it?

11. Formalization
In many countries, there was a shift from direct repression to creeping but insistent legalisation of illegal housing. To what extent differ processes of formalization in different parts of the world?

Not all of these ideas might sound useful. Presumably, more important ones deserve to be added. Feel free to do so. Of course, the final programme is subject to the expertise of the participants.

Please submit your abstract and a short bio to:
u.grashoff@ucl.ac.uk

CFP: "War Frenzy: Exploring the Violence of Propaganda" (May 2017, Princeton)

Deadline: January 10, 2017

Princeton Conjunction
An Annual Interdisciplinary Conference
May 11-May 13, 2017


In July 1942, in the middle of the Nazi advancement in the Soviet Union, Ilya Ehrenburg, one of the most cosmopolitan Soviet writers, addressed Soviet soldiers through the Soviet military newspaper Krasnaia Zvezda (Red Star). In the preceding decades, Ehrenburg became famous for his whimsical dispatches from Paris and Berlin. This time, his address was unambiguously titled “Kill them!”, appealing:

We know everything. We remember everything. We understand it now: Germans are not people… Enough of talking. Enough of outrage. Now, it’s time to kill. …Stop counting days. Stop counting miles. Count only the Germans you’ve killed… Do not fail to hit. Do not miss the target. Kill!

A classic example of war propaganda, the address framed war affectively. Deploying words and images as rhetorical weapon, Ehrenburg constituted a collectivity, channeling its anger and anxiety, providing it with a clearly defined aim, and suggesting an action to take. Descriptive and prescriptive at the same time, the address interpellated its audience, transforming readers into avengers.

Propaganda has always been a crucial part of war. Mobilizing through polarization, distortion and simplification, it helped to produce an effect of ideological cohesion and social solidarity, which, in turn, often resulted in disastrous military conflicts: be it the wars in Yugoslavia in the 1990s, the Iraq war of the last decade, or the current wars in Ukraine and Syria (to name just a few). The program committee of this conference invites historically, ethnographically and theoretically grounded contributions that explore the role of propaganda in unleashing and framing military conflicts of the last century.

We are interested in studies that go beyond descriptive representations of violent narratives, and explore instead internal mechanisms and external effects of war propaganda. We especially welcome submissions that analyze how wars are translated and transposed into such fields of cultural production as music, dance, computer games, architecture, and/or performing arts: How is the mobilizing effect achieved in these different fields? How do these fields envision their target audience?

We seek submissions that analyze how media and social networks create their own ways of disseminating war accounts and in galvanizing their audience: does the private consumption of Youtube videos make this medium significantly different from more traditional propaganda newsreels? Are Facebook postings qualitatively distinct from propaganda flyers or, say, Ehrenburg’s address?

As recent studies of war propaganda and hate speech have shown, much of the affective efficacy of these forms of discursive mobilization hinges on their ability to convert the past into a historical justification for violence, retribution or revenge in the present. This propagandistic linking of past wars with today’s conflicts is another crucial aspect that we hope to explore at this conference: How are historical examples of war or genocide “recycled” and “repurposed” in order to perceive new military conflicts? What are the methods of representation and types of referencing that make war history relevant? Which networks and institutions capitalize on the usable past by historicizing military invasions and conflicts?

We look for participants who analyze rhetorical tools, narrative strategies, and visual devices that recharge historical records with new affective power. In particular, we welcome submissions that demonstrate how historical documents have been used, adapted, transformed and modified (visually, sonically, chronologically, etc.) by mass media not only for constructing and conveying their propaganda messages but also for turning these documents into technologically advanced and emotionally appealing artifacts.

We invite submissions from scholars in a range of disciplines including history, anthropology, rhetoric, sociology, politics, law, human rights, psychology, military science, art, film, media and literary criticism, who study war conflicts and their symbolic representations. While we are especially interested in understanding how war and propaganda shaped up the perception of conflicts in Eastern Europe and former Soviet Union during the last few decades, we also welcome contributions from scholars working on related issues in other sites as well.

Please send your abstract (300 words) and a short CV to the Program committee at warfrenzy2017@gmail.com by January 10, 2017.

Those selected to give presentations at the conference will be contacted early February 2017. Final papers will be due no later than April 15, and they will be posted on the conference’s website.

Pending funding, subsidies for graduate students and participants from the overseas may be available.

Job: Research Associate, Russia

Deadline: December 12, 2016

TITLE: Research Associate-Russia
DEPARTMENT: Center for Naval Warfare Studies
OPEN PERIOD: Tuesday, November 22, 2016 to Monday, December 12, 2016
POSITION: Excepted Service
SECURITY CLEARANCE: Secret
WHO MAY APPLY: All qualified U.S. citizens

We're looking for a recent (or soon-to-be) graduate
(master's preferred, but we can make a case for a bachelor's in very
exceptional circumstances), Russian language ability a definite plus,
who is interested in a job as a research assistant/program manager. That
person would work very closely with me to develop independent and
collaborative research, as well as help manage larger events such as
conferences and workshops. Applicants will be screened for a
secret-level clearance, so they must be American citizens.

Applicants must reference VA#NWC-17-12 and submit their application
package electronically to: cnwsvacancy3@usnwc.edu
<mailto:cnwsvacancy1@usnwc.edu>.

 The application package must include:
1) cover letter, 2) curriculum vitae, and 3) the names and contact
information for three references. 

Any current or prior military service should be
described including assignments, positions held, highest rank attained,
and dates of service. Questions should be directed to the chair of the
search committee, Prof. Peter Dutton at Duttonp@usnwc.edu


Monday, December 5, 2016

Fellowship: Fellowships in Ukrainian Studies at Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute

Deadline: January 16,2017 

The Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute is now accepting applications for its 2017-2018 Research Fellowships in Ukrainian Studies. 

Deadline: January 16, 2017 
Application: Online


HURI's fellowship program supports distinguished scholars from around the world to carry out research in residence on topics pertaining to Ukrainian Studies. While at HURI, they can connect with experts and make use of the resources at Harvard University, including its vast library collections.

For the 2017-2018 academic year, the following fellowships are offered:  
  • The Jaroslaw and Nadia Mihaychuk Postdoctoral Research Fellowships 
  • The Eugene and Daymel Shklar Research Fellowships (mid-career) 
  • The Ukrainian Studies Fund Research Fellowships (mid-career) 
Fellows receive a stipend ($3,300 per month) to assist with the cost of housing, health insurance, and living expenses. The fellowships also provide direct roundtrip travel to Harvard University.

Eligibility: Individuals must have demonstrated a commitment to Ukrainian Studies and hold a doctorate in history, literature, philology, culture, or a related area of study in the humanities and social sciences fields. Proposals for projects lasting three to nine months are considered.

Read about the 2016-2017 fellows here

Visit our website or contact Tamara Nary for additional information: nary@fas.harvard.edu 617-495-3549